Christmas Tree Still Up? The National Fire Protection Association Suggests You Take It Down Now by 30Seconds Mom

Holidays
a year ago

Christmas Tree Still Up? The National Fire Protection Association Suggests You Take It Down Now

One-third (33 percent) of U.S. home fires involving Christmas trees occur in January. With this post-holiday fire hazard in mind, the National Fire Protection Association® (NFPA) strongly encourages everyone to keep the festive memories and remove the hazards by disposing of Christmas trees promptly after the holiday season.

“As much as we all enjoy the look and feel of Christmas trees in our homes, they’re large combustible items that have the potential to result in serious fires,” said Lorraine Carli, vice president of Outreach and Advocacy at. “The longer Christmas trees remain in homes, the longer they present a risk.”

Carli notes that fresh Christmas trees, which continue to dry out and become more flammable over time, are involved in a much larger share of reported Christmas tree fires than artificial trees.

According to the latest Christmas Tree Fires report from NFPA, 160 home structure fires began with Christmas trees, resulting in two civilian deaths, 11 civilian injuries and $12 million in direct property damage, on average each year between 2016 and 2020. Overall, fires that begin with Christmas trees represent a very small but notable part of the U.S. fire problem, considering that they are generally in use for a short time each year.

To safely dispose of a Christmas tree, NFPA recommends using the local community’s recycling program, if possible; trees should not be put in the garage or left outside. NFPA also offers these tips for safely removing lighting and decorations to ensure that they remain in good condition:

  • Use the gripping area on the plug when unplugging electrical decorations. Never pull the cord to unplug any device from an electrical outlet, as this can harm the wire and insulation of the cord, increasing the risk for shock or electrical fire.
  • As you pack up light strings, inspect each line for damage, throwing out any sets that have loose connections, broken sockets or cracked or bare wires.
  • Wrap each set of lights and put them in individual plastic bags or wrap them around a piece of cardboard.
  • Store electrical decorations in a dry place away from children and pets where they will not be damaged by water or dampness.

For more information on home fire safety all winter long, visit Put a Freeze on Winter Fires, a winter safety campaign NFPA promotes annually with the U.S. Fire Administration.

Source: Press release from NFPA

Note: 30Seconds is a participant in the Amazon affiliate advertising program and this post contains affiliate links, which means we may earn a commission or fees if you make a purchase via those links. 

Take 30 seconds and join the 30Seconds community, and follow us on Facebook to get inspiration in your newsfeed daily. Inspire and be inspired.

Related Products on Amazon We Think You May Like:

30Second Mobile, Inc. is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

Get Your Fireplace & Dryer Vent Cleaned Annually! Here's Why!

Winter Health Hazard: How to Take Care of Your Heart & Back While Shoveling Snow

Winter Car Safety: Turn Wipers Off Before Turning Off Your Car (Here's Why!)

Holistic Remedies for Seasonal Affective Disorder: How to Beat the Winter Blues Naturally

Donna John
Yes! Let's take those live trees down now. (Artificial, too!) :-)
Julio Caro
Thanks for Sharing...

join discussion

Please login to comment.

recommended tips

Creative Ways to Decorate Your House: How to Design Your Living Space With Memories of Home(s)

Houston Flooding: 3 Common Flood Cleanup Fails & Power Outage Tips for Homeowners

Get Your Fireplace & Dryer Vent Cleaned Annually! Here's Why!

Beyond Sleep Issues: 4 Daylight Savings Time Tips to Keep You on Track!