Our Silence Ends Now on Racism: How the Church Can Rise Up With a Promise of Hope by Lauren Carrier Horton

Our Silence Ends Now on Racism: How the Church Can Rise Up With a Promise of Hope

I refuse to let our black brothers and sisters stand alone. I refuse to remain silent.

On Sunday, May 31, 2020, along with several thousands of others, my family and I marched the streets of Charlotte, North Carolina, in unity to demand that the silence of the church on behalf of racial injustice end. Sponsored by several churches in our city, the Queen City, we marched in peace and unity, led by prayer and worship, declaring that we see the injustice, we hear the cries for help.

I will not let the church sit back on this for any longer. The church is the body of Christ and therefore we must move as He was moved, and He is moved by injustice still today. For our God is a God of justice (Isaiah 30:18). His Spirit is now and here, and where His Spirit is there is freedom. Where you find silence, oppression, indifference and apathy you will not find His Spirit. God does not abide in those places, but He abides where there is love.

After the march, my black male friend told me his heart was so heavy this last week, but that the march he too participated in that day in Charlotte, restored his hope.

The church can restore hope to our brothers and sisters. It is not enough that we are just in church together on Sundays. When we can say, "I see you, my black brothers and sisters, sitting in pews next to me, leading our church choir and serving in places of need, and now I stand with you and next to you on the streets and in our neighborhoods," then justice begins to happen. Hope rises up. Love prevails.

There is no greater love than to lay down one’s life for his friends. (John 15:13) 

When I kept silent my bones wasted away. (Psalm 32:3)

Photo: Church of the Pilgrims building exterior with sign for Black Lives Matter in Washington, D.C., in 2017

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Elisa A. Schmitz 30Seconds
"Where you find silence, oppression, indifference and apathy you will not find His Spirit. God does not abide in those places, but He abides where there is love." Beautifully said, Lauren Carrier Horton . Thank you for getting out there. Thank you for calling on the church for hope during this time of crisis and need. Thank you for showing your love to those who need it most. And thank you for sharing this with us. Your words make a difference. Your actions make a difference. Your family makes a difference!
Tribe
Thank you for doing this. I appreciate the religious perspective. The church needs to have a role in helping us through this tragedy.
Cassiday
Incredible photos of your family. “I am your brother.” God bless you.
Ann Marie Gardinier Halstead
This is beautiful, @laurench. Thank you for sharing it with us and for being such a great example for your kids and for all of us as well. xoxo

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