Report Cards: Here's Why Parents Shouldn't Be Afraid of the First Report Card of the School Year by Pepi Silverman


Report Cards: Here's Why Parents Shouldn't Be Afraid of the First Report Card of the School Year

As leaves change colors, for many students and their families the first report card period is about to end. That means that the first report card for the school year will be on its way into family homes. For some families, those documents are anticipated positively, but for far too many families, that small piece of paper is the origin of stress and disappointment. By reframing the way in which the report card is perceived, that small piece of paper can be utilized as merely “information” on student progress.

  • Consider the data as a baseline for the start of the school year.
  • Compare the data against previous report cards to measure progress over time.
  • Seek understanding on the data that was used to determine the grades listed.
  • Talk with teachers on how your child compares to other grade-level peers.
  • If the report card reflects areas of concern, request a meeting with the school team.

Student performance should be measured with multiple sources of data, so report cards should not be given more weight than one piece of progress information. Keep open lines of communication with your child’s teacher in order to stay engaged and informed about your child’s education. 

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Mike Prochaska
Nah report card don't mean anything at the beginning of the year

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