Accepting Mortality: If You Live Each Day As If It Was Your Last, Someday You Will Be Right by Jonathan Oliver

Fatherhood Tip of the Day
3 months ago
Accepting Mortality: If You Live Each Day As If It Was Your Last, Someday You Will Be Right

One of the first thoughts that slapped me in the face when I became a father was the thought of my mortality. For the first time in my life, I had actually come to the realization that one day I'm going to die.

I knew it was always on the table, obviously, but that still didn't stop me from doing risky and irresponsible things as if I was invincible. I've been married for nine and a half years and it took me six years to make a will. Why? Because I thought I would have enough time to get to it eventually.

After having my daughter, Journey, I’ve become more aware that I don't have time to waste thinking about “getting to it eventually.” I need to get to it now. For the first time in my life, when I walked out of my front door to enjoy a night out on the town with my beautiful wife, the thoughts on my mind weren't about sex after our date, the restaurant or the food. "I" wasn't even in the equation.

The prayer running through my mind first and foremost was, “God, please let us return home safely.”

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Elisa All Schmitz 30Seconds
Great reflection, Jonathan Oliver . When we become parents, everything changes. We're so much more aware of our mortality. I breathed a huge sigh of relief when my "babies" turned 18, because I was so happy I had gotten them that far in life. There's much further to go, of course, but hitting that milestone literally brought me to tears. Thank you for this.
Lisa Hix
I feel 100% the same!
Ron Howard
Oh how right you are!! The same feeling hit me when we had our daughter 7 years ago and again with my son 5 years ago. I’m 51 now and I remember when my dad was 51. He was in horrible shape then but thankfully I’m doing much better. I started a diary for my kids; one each, to put down things I want them to remember... life lessons and feelings I had as I raised them.

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